shingworks:

operationbabyhave:

A TRAITOR TO HIS NOBLE AMERICAN HERITAGE

If you have not had the pleasure of reading Ainsley’s irl adventures in babyhaving, you are missing out A LOT.
1) She’s a REAL doctor of entomology! Who 2) moved to Australia, the land of horrible monster insects and cute marsupials and 3) documented pretty much her entire pregnancy/ adventures in parenting via comics. If you like semi-technical science jokes and slice-of-life “I created a human oh god” writing, you may enjoy these. They are just charming as all hell.

shingworks:

operationbabyhave:

A TRAITOR TO HIS NOBLE AMERICAN HERITAGE

If you have not had the pleasure of reading Ainsley’s irl adventures in babyhaving, you are missing out A LOT.

1) She’s a REAL doctor of entomology! Who 2) moved to Australia, the land of horrible monster insects and cute marsupials and 3) documented pretty much her entire pregnancy/ adventures in parenting via comics. If you like semi-technical science jokes and slice-of-life “I created a human oh god” writing, you may enjoy these. They are just charming as all hell.

Google, Roboto and Design PR By Khoi Vinh on Subtraction.com


  These changes sound like legitimate improvements, but they seem to be about par for the course in the refinement of any typeface. They’re just presented in this article in a hocus pocus manner intended to wow uninitiated audiences with the dark witchcraft of type design. There’s nothing remarkable here at all, and certainly nothing to suggest that Roboto deserves to be thought of as “the font of the future.” Even the mention that this new iteration of Roboto has been tested “on a ‘big pile of devices,’ ranging from tiny smartwatches up to huge flat-screen TVs, to make sure it looked good at every size and from every angle” is a paper-thin claim. While commendable, that kind of testing is de rigueur for any font that hopes to be an operating system default in this day and age.

Google, Roboto and Design PR By Khoi Vinh on Subtraction.com

These changes sound like legitimate improvements, but they seem to be about par for the course in the refinement of any typeface. They’re just presented in this article in a hocus pocus manner intended to wow uninitiated audiences with the dark witchcraft of type design. There’s nothing remarkable here at all, and certainly nothing to suggest that Roboto deserves to be thought of as “the font of the future.” Even the mention that this new iteration of Roboto has been tested “on a ‘big pile of devices,’ ranging from tiny smartwatches up to huge flat-screen TVs, to make sure it looked good at every size and from every angle” is a paper-thin claim. While commendable, that kind of testing is de rigueur for any font that hopes to be an operating system default in this day and age.

Looks by Dr. Dre by Khoi Vinh


  When Apple acquired Beats in the spring, there was some confusion as to why; some people didn’t understand why Apple would want to get into the premium headphones market, while others (including myself) speculated that Apple was buying into the emerging streaming music market. This afternoon I found myself looking through Beatsbydre.com, and one possible reason suddenly hit me: Beats headphones come in tons of color combinations.


(Via Daring Fireball)

Looks by Dr. Dre by Khoi Vinh

When Apple acquired Beats in the spring, there was some confusion as to why; some people didn’t understand why Apple would want to get into the premium headphones market, while others (including myself) speculated that Apple was buying into the emerging streaming music market. This afternoon I found myself looking through Beatsbydre.com, and one possible reason suddenly hit me: Beats headphones come in tons of color combinations.

(Via Daring Fireball)