Google, Roboto and Design PR By Khoi Vinh on Subtraction.com


  These changes sound like legitimate improvements, but they seem to be about par for the course in the refinement of any typeface. They’re just presented in this article in a hocus pocus manner intended to wow uninitiated audiences with the dark witchcraft of type design. There’s nothing remarkable here at all, and certainly nothing to suggest that Roboto deserves to be thought of as “the font of the future.” Even the mention that this new iteration of Roboto has been tested “on a ‘big pile of devices,’ ranging from tiny smartwatches up to huge flat-screen TVs, to make sure it looked good at every size and from every angle” is a paper-thin claim. While commendable, that kind of testing is de rigueur for any font that hopes to be an operating system default in this day and age.

Google, Roboto and Design PR By Khoi Vinh on Subtraction.com

These changes sound like legitimate improvements, but they seem to be about par for the course in the refinement of any typeface. They’re just presented in this article in a hocus pocus manner intended to wow uninitiated audiences with the dark witchcraft of type design. There’s nothing remarkable here at all, and certainly nothing to suggest that Roboto deserves to be thought of as “the font of the future.” Even the mention that this new iteration of Roboto has been tested “on a ‘big pile of devices,’ ranging from tiny smartwatches up to huge flat-screen TVs, to make sure it looked good at every size and from every angle” is a paper-thin claim. While commendable, that kind of testing is de rigueur for any font that hopes to be an operating system default in this day and age.

Looks by Dr. Dre by Khoi Vinh


  When Apple acquired Beats in the spring, there was some confusion as to why; some people didn’t understand why Apple would want to get into the premium headphones market, while others (including myself) speculated that Apple was buying into the emerging streaming music market. This afternoon I found myself looking through Beatsbydre.com, and one possible reason suddenly hit me: Beats headphones come in tons of color combinations.


(Via Daring Fireball)

Looks by Dr. Dre by Khoi Vinh

When Apple acquired Beats in the spring, there was some confusion as to why; some people didn’t understand why Apple would want to get into the premium headphones market, while others (including myself) speculated that Apple was buying into the emerging streaming music market. This afternoon I found myself looking through Beatsbydre.com, and one possible reason suddenly hit me: Beats headphones come in tons of color combinations.

(Via Daring Fireball)

Lomography Petzval 85mm F2.2 lens


  A reproduction of a a lens designed in 1840 by Joseph Petzval - one of the foremost optical physicists of his day. Previous photographic lenses tended to have very small maximum apertures, and this resulted in extremely long exposure times (especially with the low sensitivity of early photographic processes). Petzval overcame this by designing a lens which used four elements in two couplets, and could be made with the then-impressive maximum aperture of f/3.7, allowing exposure times measured in seconds rather than minutes.
  
  It’s the very imperfections of Petzval’s design [compared toy modern lenses] that have inspired the lens’s resurrection. These flaws, including field curvature and vignetting, give a characteristic look to the images it creates that some photographers value highly, and which really can’t be mimicked in post-processing.


(Digital Photography Review)

Lomography Petzval 85mm F2.2 lens

A reproduction of a a lens designed in 1840 by Joseph Petzval - one of the foremost optical physicists of his day. Previous photographic lenses tended to have very small maximum apertures, and this resulted in extremely long exposure times (especially with the low sensitivity of early photographic processes). Petzval overcame this by designing a lens which used four elements in two couplets, and could be made with the then-impressive maximum aperture of f/3.7, allowing exposure times measured in seconds rather than minutes.

It’s the very imperfections of Petzval’s design [compared toy modern lenses] that have inspired the lens’s resurrection. These flaws, including field curvature and vignetting, give a characteristic look to the images it creates that some photographers value highly, and which really can’t be mimicked in post-processing.

(Digital Photography Review)