Lomography Petzval 85mm F2.2 lens


  A reproduction of a a lens designed in 1840 by Joseph Petzval - one of the foremost optical physicists of his day. Previous photographic lenses tended to have very small maximum apertures, and this resulted in extremely long exposure times (especially with the low sensitivity of early photographic processes). Petzval overcame this by designing a lens which used four elements in two couplets, and could be made with the then-impressive maximum aperture of f/3.7, allowing exposure times measured in seconds rather than minutes.
  
  It’s the very imperfections of Petzval’s design [compared toy modern lenses] that have inspired the lens’s resurrection. These flaws, including field curvature and vignetting, give a characteristic look to the images it creates that some photographers value highly, and which really can’t be mimicked in post-processing.


(Digital Photography Review)

Lomography Petzval 85mm F2.2 lens

A reproduction of a a lens designed in 1840 by Joseph Petzval - one of the foremost optical physicists of his day. Previous photographic lenses tended to have very small maximum apertures, and this resulted in extremely long exposure times (especially with the low sensitivity of early photographic processes). Petzval overcame this by designing a lens which used four elements in two couplets, and could be made with the then-impressive maximum aperture of f/3.7, allowing exposure times measured in seconds rather than minutes.

It’s the very imperfections of Petzval’s design [compared toy modern lenses] that have inspired the lens’s resurrection. These flaws, including field curvature and vignetting, give a characteristic look to the images it creates that some photographers value highly, and which really can’t be mimicked in post-processing.

(Digital Photography Review)

eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 

For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.

In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence

rudygodinez:

Kenzo Tange, Yoyogi National Indoor Stadiums, (1961-1964)

Built for the Tokyo Summer Games in 1964, the complex consists of two indoor arenas connected by a central spine that also houses ancillary and office functions. Structural design was handled by Tsuboi Yoshikatsu and his associate Kawaguchi Mamoru, but Tange’s team participated extensively in a joint design process. The basic structure for both buildings relied on cable suspension technology developed for bridges, but as an architectural project, the challenge was to  create interior enclosures under the span. The urban aspects of Yoyogi Stadiums deserve as much notice as the project’s obvious formal virtuosity. One of the last large undeveloped tracts in central Tokyo, the stadium area was conceived as part of a ring of major open spaces in the cities dense center. The site plan extends beyond the stadium site’s boundry in the northeast corner to include a traffic intersection, a signifigant urban intervention to bring together the dense fabric of upper Shibuya and new large-scale institutional facilities such as the local ward office, the headquarters of Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NKH), and the stadiums themselves. The two spiraling tails of the stadium site provide further linkage from the upper Shibuya area to Harajuku and Meiji Shrine.