Google, Roboto and Design PR By Khoi Vinh on Subtraction.com


  These changes sound like legitimate improvements, but they seem to be about par for the course in the refinement of any typeface. They’re just presented in this article in a hocus pocus manner intended to wow uninitiated audiences with the dark witchcraft of type design. There’s nothing remarkable here at all, and certainly nothing to suggest that Roboto deserves to be thought of as “the font of the future.” Even the mention that this new iteration of Roboto has been tested “on a ‘big pile of devices,’ ranging from tiny smartwatches up to huge flat-screen TVs, to make sure it looked good at every size and from every angle” is a paper-thin claim. While commendable, that kind of testing is de rigueur for any font that hopes to be an operating system default in this day and age.

Google, Roboto and Design PR By Khoi Vinh on Subtraction.com

These changes sound like legitimate improvements, but they seem to be about par for the course in the refinement of any typeface. They’re just presented in this article in a hocus pocus manner intended to wow uninitiated audiences with the dark witchcraft of type design. There’s nothing remarkable here at all, and certainly nothing to suggest that Roboto deserves to be thought of as “the font of the future.” Even the mention that this new iteration of Roboto has been tested “on a ‘big pile of devices,’ ranging from tiny smartwatches up to huge flat-screen TVs, to make sure it looked good at every size and from every angle” is a paper-thin claim. While commendable, that kind of testing is de rigueur for any font that hopes to be an operating system default in this day and age.

Blurring the ABCs by Tobias Frere-Jones


  Letters are scattered all over the living room floor. Not designs of my own, but toys for our son. Letters for sticking on refrigerator doors, fitting into puzzles, stamping in finger-paint, or floating in a bathtub. There’s even a bag of gummy letters in the kitchen.
  
  They’re all made by different hands, and in varying materials. As far as I can tell, they don’t aspire to any explicit style, but only to present the alphabet with minimum distraction. But there’s more noise and confusion here than their makers may realize.

Blurring the ABCs by Tobias Frere-Jones

Letters are scattered all over the living room floor. Not designs of my own, but toys for our son. Letters for sticking on refrigerator doors, fitting into puzzles, stamping in finger-paint, or floating in a bathtub. There’s even a bag of gummy letters in the kitchen.

They’re all made by different hands, and in varying materials. As far as I can tell, they don’t aspire to any explicit style, but only to present the alphabet with minimum distraction. But there’s more noise and confusion here than their makers may realize.

myfonts:

Millie is a new geometric script font that was inspired by the Milwaukee Tools logo. It’s a versatile family, with a rounded and a sharp style, each with 6 weights. 

Took me a ridiculously long time to work out how the rising baseline was achieved.

cjwho:

a typographic miniature golf course by ollie willis

london based graphic designer ollie willis has created a typographic miniature golf course. willis is not a golfer, but he does design typefaces and he found an analogy between golfing and graphic design — they both require patience, precision, and are often considered by their respective professionals to incite a range of emotion: frustration but ultimately fulfillment. in the structure, bright green astroturf is fitted into a contoured wooden frame and the course follows the curve around the lowercase, sans-serif letter ‘g’, the first letter in willis’s series.

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